Welcome to LA6VJA


Welcome to the homepage of Norwegian Amateur Radio Station LA6VJA. If you are looking for information regarding the JW6VJA activations, please follow the link on the menu above. Anyway, feel free to have a look around.



The modulator rack in the basement.

I live in a country known for its natural beauty, fisheries, oil/gas production and social welfare system. My home QTH is in Moss/JO59HK, which is located in the south-eastern part of the country. The captial city of Oslo is only some 60 km to the north, easily within range by train (when they run).

For those of you who don't know much about Norway, it's a small country in northern Europe, home to some 4.6 million more or less happy Norwegians. Furher information is available in the CIA World Factbook. Although common belief among non-Norwegians is that Norway has winter all year, the summer is often quite nice. Even warm enough for sunflowers to grow (have a look at the graphics at the top of this page). Effective from July 10th, 2010, I have taken over development of the Win-EQF* logging program.



WLOTA LH-3174 first activation by LA9VDA and LA6VJA on 06-Jan-2012.

My QTH is on Jeløy island, WLOTA LH-3174. Within visual sight of ARLHS NOR-302 and ARLHS NOR-389.



Icom on the go.

The shack currently includes an Icom IC-7600 as well as an IC-7000. A Yaesu FT-950 is located at the mountain QTH at approx. 950m ASL. A Kenwood TS-590S serves as a handy radio when none of the others do. I'm not quite sure when, but it's a nice thing to have around, and it's certainly a nice radio to bring along for the JW operations.

An IC-703 serves the purpose for mobile HF operation. A Yaesu FT-817 also hangs around. An Elecraft KX3 has recently been added to the collection, as I learned to like the radio a lot when I received a tour of the Elecraft facilities in CA, USA, during  the spring of 2012. Running Begali, Bencher and Palm Radio paddles and LogiKey keyers. 

Kenwood's TS-690SAT and TS-50 as well as Icom's IC-7400, IC-756ProIII and IC-706MKIIG have also secured several QSOs in the log since 1995 but have all been traded in for more capable models. QRV on D-STAR with the Icom IC-E2820/ID-800 and APRS with the Kenwood TM-D710/TH-D72 as well as some homebrew combinations of surplus HTs and tracker units. QRV on VHF/UHF for /P operation with the Yaesu VX-3, VX-6 and VX-7 HTs. The Butternut HF9V serves me well both at my home QTH and at the weekend QTH.

You will find me on CW and digital modes on the HF bands. Sometimes I am also cleaning away the dust from the microphone, but I am more than happy to leave the "hola hooola" SSB operation to south European stations.

Memberships are currently held in the NRRL, the ARRL as well as clubs LA9H, LA3F and LA3T.

I am employed as an airline pilot, flying the DHC8-300/-Q400 series for a Norwegian airline. Though I have previously flown the B737-300/-500 for an airline within the SAS Group, flying the DHC8 gives me the opportunity to work closer to my home QTH and spend more time off duty. Unfortunately, the DHC8 aircraft (all series) were not designed for life-long flying careers (noise, vibrations and airconditioning issues - all which could have been resolved, if only deHavilland/Bombardier had cared about the people flying these things and not just the $). I hold an M.Sc. degree in computer science and I run a small consulting business when I am not flying, programming, calling CQ or enjoying life as a PADI Divemaster. From time to time I also exercise the privileges as a flight examiner, which I have been granted by the Norwegian CAA.




At work... it's a hard life. I used to fly the B737 for a living, but now I fly the DHC8. For sure a smaller and more noisy aircraft, but also a more laxed work schedule.




DHC8 operation at HVG/ENHV, near North Cape.




Superb engineering by Icom. A truly amazing boat-anchor, just like the 756ProIII which I traded in for this upgrade.